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Food Tech Research - Learning to Cook - Food Questions, Safety & Cooking Problems - Sneakykitchen Forums
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 Posted: Wed Jul 20th, 2005 06:19 am
 
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Tom R
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Dear sir/madam,

I am a GCSE food tech student researching my design brief: You are being asked to design and make a dessert, which is suitable for diabetics in a hospital. I was hoping you might be able to provide me with some information on the following areas that will help my specification and design ideas.

Any information about special ingredients that should/should not be in a diabetic dessert. Ways in which I can add sweetness without using sugar. How much sugar is allowed. Is natural sugar allowed and if so how much. Any other useful information about diabetic desserts.

May I take this opportunity to thank you for your help in this matter. Yours faithfully, Tom R., Devon, England.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 20th, 2005 06:21 am
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bessnfloyd
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Normally when asked a question or required to write an article or dissertation on a subject, it's expected that the subject was part of the course.  That's not always the case - a few teachers see fit to take short-cuts and skip part of the instruction plan or text and the student doesn't take the initiative to study on his or her own.  Or perhaps you were out of class or not paying attention.



Diabetes, especially in a hospital setting, can be very touchy.  There are many levels and more than one type of diabetes.  Is the blood sugar under control?  Is the patient in for circulatory problems?  Is there a wound or surgical procedure involved (diabetics heal slowly unless their blood sugar is strictly in normal range).  Until you know a lot more about the patient's condition you cannot tell how much sugar they should eat, and that "sugar" even includes starches, fruits and even some veggies, etc. which the body can quickly convert to sugar.  The entire diet needs to be taken into consideration before desserts can be calculated individually for a diabetic patient.  In the USA this is usually done by a registered dietitian.



In any case, the best thing a diabetic can do is erase the word "dessert" from their vocabulary and mental library, and enjoy an abundance of green veggies, salads, beans and fish, and learn to use olive oil, ground flax seed and other Omega-3-rich food sources.  Desserts, by definition, are sweet.  If you remove the sugar, and usually the fruit and starch, too (depending on severity of disease and total meal plan) you probably have mostly non-nutritive material, real "junk food", something I'm entirely against!



Sugars include chemical compounds that end in "ose" (sucrose, fructose, maltose, lactose, etc.).  Sweeteners that do not raise blood sugar include aspartame, often marketed as Nutrasweet, saccharin and sucralose.  There is conflicting evidence about their toxicities and/or long term effects, with many scientists giving them the green light and others stern warnings.   Stevia, a plant extract, has been used in many countries for centuries for sweetening.  It does have a slight aftertaste, but no more so than aspartame or saccharin, just different.  It is not approved for sweetening in the USA although it is legal to buy it from "health food" stores or sites and utilize it for that purpose.  It would probably be inappropriate in a hospital setting. 



Looks to me like if they expect you to have to utilize this knowledge, you need to go back and hit the books!



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Bess W.
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 Posted: Fri Aug 26th, 2005 02:50 pm
 
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Battle
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Dear tom

           In regards to your question i will give you some advice on the ingreadients matter. Before you start cooking you need to be aware that there are two types of diabetics. type1 and type2. One needs high amounts of sugar to survive and the other must stay away from sugar. So before you began you must ask your tutor which one will be required of you to do. If you choose the type which needs plenty of sugar your answer is simple. Use ingredients which contain a high amount of glucose. i.e. sugar, chocolate ect... but you must try and avoid the use of a lot of fats. limit what fats you use, if fats are neccessary and avoid high cholesterol fats because these can be very dangerous to any type of diabetic as they will form a fatty substance in the arteries, limiting the amount of blood to different organs and this is extremely leatal and life threatening. Basically most ingreadients can be used, except one - Glucos Fructose Corn Syrup, this must be avoided as this increases the blood pressure rapidly and if given to a diabetic could kill them, oh, and it makes you gain weight like crazy.. If you decide to choose the type which must limit its sugar intake then you need to be very careful of all the ingredients you use. The one thing you must avoid first is sugar. No sugar can be used in your cooking at all. Natural sugars are found in everything therefore a diabetic of this type cannot cope with any excess sugar. Avoid using most sugar substitutes as these are just as bad, although there are some good ones available on the market which may be used. As most sweet products, if not all of them contain sugar or need it then these type of desserts are best avoided. the best ingredientys to us are fruits. A nice fruit salad or Fruit trifle are ideal for diabetics of this type and could help them lead a healthier life without increasing the blood pressure and sugar levels.

                           i hope you found my advice helpful

                                                   yours N.Battle

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